Read PDF Abused by Therapy: How Searching for Childhood Trauma can Damage Adult Lives

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The Effects of Childhood Trauma

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Shifting the paradigm

About this product Description Description. Abused by Therapy debunks an enduring myth dating back to Freud, that certain conditions are nearly always caused by childhood trauma.

Therapists believing this will use recovered memory therapy to search for this hidden cause behind current problems. They may find it - but what exactly are they finding? Or, if you were in a car accident, you might have strong memories about the sound of the crash or a vivid picture of blood all over yourself or someone else involved.

What help is available?

For example, if you were in a car accident, you might have frequent nightmares about being in the accident yourself, or about other people being involved in accidents. Some people with PTSD who were assaulted will have nightmares of being chased, and the person chasing them in the dream might not be the person who assaulted them. Some people with this symptom might speak and act as if they are physically in the traumatic situation, whereas others might appear to simply stare off into space for a period of time.

Flashbacks can seem very real, and some people describe it as a picture or movie that they can see clearly in their minds. This can include becoming very upset when hearing tires squeal if you were in a car accident, or feeling anxious when watching violence on TV, if you were assaulted. This can include panic-like symptoms. For example, someone might experience an increase in heart rate, sweat and increased body temperature when passing the site of their car accident. Symptoms of avoidance at least 1 symptom for diagnosis Avoiding thoughts, feelings or memories related to the trauma.

Although many people with PTSD will avoid any reminders of their traumatic experience, it is also common for people to avoid even thinking about what happened. For example, if you have thoughts or memories about what happened, you might try to push them out of your head.

Got Your ACE Score?

Reminders can include: Conversations e. Negative changes in thinking or mood at least 2 symptoms for diagnosis : Not able to recall parts of the trauma e. The world is dangerous, I am a bad person Distorted beliefs about the cause or consequences of the trauma e.

It is all my fault Persistent negative mood or state e.

Read more about this story. Share Share. Tags PTSD. Review this Book. Abused by Therapy debunks an enduring myth dating back to Freud, that certain conditions are nearly always caused by childhood trauma. Therapists believing this will use recovered memory therapy to search for this hidden cause behind current problems.

They may find it — but what exactly are they finding? This unique book gives an inside view of the process by which people are persuaded to rewrite their past history, so that loving parents become seen as abusers who must be rejected. The new memories may be completely false, yet they can shatter the lives of all concerned: not just the clients and their accused families, but also the therapists themselves, who become trapped into upholding increasingly implausible and distressing beliefs. An international campaign is now promoting the view that dissociative disorders, such as multiple personality disorder, are caused by severe early trauma.